How to Write a Sales Prospecting Email to a IT Hiring Manager Blog Feature
Dan Fisher

By: Dan Fisher on October 2nd, 2014

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How to Write a Sales Prospecting Email to a IT Hiring Manager

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Dear Jim,

My name is Dan Fisher and my company is Menemsha Group, a sales training and sales enablement solutions company that provides sales training, coaching, workshops and How to write a sales prospecting email to a IT hiring managersoftware products for IT staffing firms.  Since 2008 we have worked with over 230 different IT staffing firm providing them with.....blah, blah, blah, blah....

Are you compelled to continue reading this email?  Me neither! Writing sales prospecting emails is NOT easy which is why salespeople agonize over writing sales prospecting emails. In this blog post, how to write a sales prospecting email to a IT hiring manager, I'm going to share some tips and ideas to help  you write effective email messages for IT hiring managers and your prospects in general.

So what is the goal when writing a sales prospecting email to a IT hiring manager and how does one accomplish that goal? The goal of a sales prospecting email is simply to get a response.  The tips below will help you do just that. After you get your response, well, you're on your own!

Step 1 Establish the Context of the Email

One thing is for sure, we can't make ourselves (the salesperson) or our service, product or company the center of attention in our email (or voice mail). You must personalize EVERY prospect email message to the persona of your buyer.  So if you're sending out mass emails, stop it because it is killing your credibility and brand.  Writing an effective and personalized email requires some basic planning and research. In 5 minutes you should be able to identify a trigger event, and leverage their linkedin profile to come up with one of the following:

  • Goal they're trying to achieve
  • Challenge they're trying to address
  • Read a blog they wrote/commented on
  • Read a trigger event about their company
  • Check out their social profile for things they care about
  • Check company web site for new events/happenings

Step 2 Write Your Subject Line

Coming up with a subject line can be nauseating and a real time killer. Hey, I'm a sales guy too, I have to deal with it as well. But here are a few ideas:

  • (Mutual friend/colleague) suggested we connect
  • Idea to share with you regarding (their challenge/goal)
  • Thought to share regarding (insert name of blog post)
  • Question regarding (recent trigger event)
  • Idea/thought regarding (recent trigger event)
  • Have you considered (insert your idea/suggestion)

Or, read this blog from Hubspot, 39 sales email subject lines that get prospects to open and respond.

Step 3 The Opening of Your Email

Do you read emails that begin with "My name is..." or "I'd like to introduce myself/my company?"  Me neither.  Start your email by referencing what you know about the prospect and his or her company. Some Examples include:

  • I noticed....
  • I read...
  • In my research I discovered you are...
  • (Mutual connection) shared with me you are..
  • I saw your post/article/update...

This opening captures the reader's attention because it is about them! Stroking their ego with a hint of flattery doesn't hurt either.

Step 4 The Body of Your Email

Don't give a really vague value proposition and don't go into "broadcast product/service pitch mode." Avoid jargon and fancy buzzwords like "cutting edge" or "revolutionary."  These terms make your prospects even more skeptical of what you have to say or offer. Instead, share a relevant case study or value proposition with them. For more details on this you can download our Value Proposition Playbook. Again, this should only be 1-2 bullet points, keep it real high level as you can discuss the details in the phone call you are going to set up. The value prop should be used simply to gain credibility and pique their interest.

Step 5 Closing Your Email

Don't give a weak close by saying "I'd really appreciate a call back" or "I would really appreciate _ amount of your time."  And don't ask for a meeting.  This makes you sound desperate and needy as if you need them more then they need you. I understand you "need" or want their business, but do not show this.  Instead, close by offering the prospect something of value and make yourself the prize.  For Example, you might say:

  • I have some ideas to offer on....call me if you would like to discuss
  • I have a suggestion on how you can improve.....
  • One of my clients achieved (state prospect's goal) and I have some insight to offer
  • One of our consultants has solved this problem and I have some insight to offer

I can be reached at......

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About Dan Fisher

I’m Dan Fisher, founder of Menemsha Group. Over 400 IT staffing firms including thousands of sales reps and recruiters apply my sales methodology including my scripts, playbooks, job aids, tools and templates, all of which is consumed from our SaaS based sales enablement platform and our mobile application. I’ve coached and mentored hundreds of sales leaders, business owners and CEO’s, and I have spoken at a variety of industry events including Staffing World, Bullhorn Engage, TechServe Alliance, Bullhorn Live, Massachusetts Staffing Association, and National Association of Personnel Services. Since 2008 I've helped IT staffing organizations quickly ramp up new hires, slash the time it takes to get new reps to open new accounts and meet quota, get more high-quality meetings with key decision makers and help leaders build a scalable sales organization. My training and coaching programs are engaging and highly interactive and are known to challenge sellers to rethink how they approach selling. Ultimately, I help sellers increase productivity, accelerate the buying process & win more deals.

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